Depression is NOT the enemy of high performance

it's tough to be vulnerableDepression is not the enemy… and is by no means unconnected to high performance

We might even consider that feeling depressed could be part of the body’s survival mechanisms kicking in to take care of you, telling you to slow down and take a rest when you are feeling physically, cognitively or emotionally overwhelmed.

When people are striving for excellence, it is not uncommon to go overboard, get unbalanced, get sick, injured, burnt out… because the mind tries to push past the limits of the body (I have a bit of first hand experience of this one, having missed out on the Olypmic Games because of overtraining-related injury). The body is smart, however, and sends the mind messages to slow things down when you are going too hard… (and that is not just going too hard physically… it is going too hard in any manner. If you are pushing the hours at work; if you are constantly wound up emotionally or thinking non-stop about things… your body gets out of balance on the neuro-chemical level).

We could think about depression a bit like hunger… when nourishment is missing, you feel discomfort.

Until you provide the body with the key ingredients to give it nourishment, it will continue to send messages of discomfort.

Those feelings can be quite unpleasant, but they are there for a reason – to get you to look closer at why you feel them, what is causing them and do something to rectify the situation.

Where depression becomes dysfunctional is when we don’t respond to those messages effectively. If you don’t treat the causes of the malnourishment, the feelings just get stronger.

By no means am I trying to diminish the extraordinarily debilitating impact of clinical depression; rather, I want to acknowledge the impacts, but challenge the world to look differently at what we are currently categorizing as a disease.

What if depression is just the clinical word for being really darn tired in multiple systems in your body? You can torture someone by depriving them of sleep. Research has shown that a severely sleep deprived person has less functional capacity than a significantly intoxicated person. Yet, we don’t say that feeling sleepy is a disease – yes we acknowledge it can be dysfunctional in your life, but it is just the body’s way of telling you that you need some sleep.

I acknowledge that depression is probably much more complex than hunger or fatigue… but the point here is that if we see depression differently, see that it might be serving a purpose in our bodies, rather than being a disease-like enemy, we might start responding to the early symptoms of it more effectively… and actually halt the spiral into the deep debilitating phases of clinical depression.

If you want to get to excellence in your performance, you need to become more aware of the signs and symptoms of imbalance – the early warning signs of a depressed state… and then take the effective actions to resolve what is causing them.

For some, there will be more easily identifiable surface causes of a depressed state – it might be mostly connected to physical overload, or chronic lack of quality recovery… however, for others, there can be things below the level of conscious awareness, which are sending your mind and emotions into overdrive, causing the imbalance.

Whatever the possible driving factors of feeling a bit flat, if you respond early, you can turn things around and get back on the track toward excellence.

My recommendations:

1. Be aware of the signs and symptoms of being in a depressed state (which is not necessarily clinically diagnosable depression) – feeling drained, heavy, fatigued (could be having trouble sleeping, or alternatively, oversleeping), feeling that things look bleak, loss of interest in previously enjoyable activities, appetite or weight changes, irritability or restlessness, self-directed negative thoughts, concentration problems, and possible unexplained aches and pains.

2. Remind yourself that these are normal reactions of the body – they are messages from your body warning you of some imbalance – physical, mental or emotional – so listen to them, don’t ignore them hoping they will go away

3. Try to identify the sources of that imbalance – is it surface stuff? (I just need to sleep and recover more) – or is it deeper stuff? (I don’t really know why I feel this way, I just do)

4. Seek professional help to understand the sources of the imbalance – if there is deeper stuff that is wearing you out from the inside, it will be very difficult to identify the sources yourself (your brain’s defense mechanisms might be quite invested in blocking them out). Often, there will be deeper levels to a depressed state if it occurs frequently and/or it seems to happen without an obvious cause (but frequently, there can be deeper levels in addition to an obvious cause). Talk to your GP, a psychologist, or a qualified mental health practitioner.

5. Take regular action to help prevent chronic imbalance – build recovery activities into your daily schedule (anything that puts energy back in the system – fun, socializing, light physical activity, relaxation, good nutrition, sleep, meditation, massage, etc.)

Hmmm… I probably could go on for years about this stuff…

The thing to get is that everyone feels depressed at some point or another – even elite athletes – it is totally NORMAL. What will make it abnormally dysfunctional is if you don’t do anything in those early stages of feeling a bit flat. To get to excellence you need to acknowledge the normality of experiencing a depressed state and spend as much or more time on your recovery as you do on working hard to achieve your goals!

Depression is not a sign of weakness. It is a sign you have been trying to be strong for too long. ~ Anonymous

All the best,

Dr Sean R

www.seanorichardson.com.au

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About drseanr

PhD - Sport Psychology... expert in high performance mindsets... passionate about helping others get the best out of themselves at all levels of performance... and obsessed with understanding and helping to remove people's barriers to success, happiness and peace
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4 Responses to Depression is NOT the enemy of high performance

  1. Great advice Sean. From one who knows.

  2. Allison Keogh says:

    Great article Sean! A good reality check 🙂

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